We know we’re lucky having access to nature on our doorstep, and the ability to help it thrive, so we’re very keen on The Wildlife Trust’s campaign for a Nature and Wellbeing Act which would give everyone – particularly children – access to nature and improve its status in national and local government decision-making.

The ambition of the Act, and the delivery mechanisms, have been likened to the Climate Change Act, and has its own implications for our response to the climate change – by building our local environment’s resilience.

Support the Act for Nature: bring about the recovery of nature in a generation, for the benefit of people and wildlife

But we don’t like to just sign a petition if we can also take some personal action.

We’re reviewing our land use, as we’ve recently renewed our agricultural tenancy, and our first job is to start planting hedges to balance our agricultural use of the land with our aim of improving the site’s biodiversity. This balance is core to the land management plan that supported our original planning application and s106, but more than that these wildlife corridors support the natural environment that in turn supports our health and wellbeing.

Woodland Trust has tree-planting packs available for others to develop these natural spaces in their school, community or farm.

Date posted: January 19, 2015 | Author: | No Comments »

Categories: Health and Well Being Sustainable living

Hockerton Housing Project is featured in a new book, The ‘One Planet’ Life: A Blueprint for Low Impact Development. The guidebook has been written ‘for everyone on the path towards a way of life in which we don’t act as if we had more than one planet Earth. The book also represents a manifesto for a change in attitude towards land use’.

You can get a taster in this informative blog about our development by the author David Thorpe, who is also a founder and core group member of the One Planet Council, and former director of publications at CAT.

If you want to see it for yourself, come on our next tour.

Eventbrite - Sustainable Living

 

Date posted: January 13, 2015 | Author: | No Comments »

Categories: Eco homes Sustainable living

We’re delighted to be joining a new mentoring service for Community Energy projects as a Peer Mentor, thanks to a new project funded by the Esmee Fairburn Foundation.

Like the other Peer Mentors across the country, we have a range of experience to share, in terms of scale and technologies, in renewable energy generation. And we are experienced in mentoring a range of projects, having run a similar service through the Energy Saving Trust, as well as our current advisory services.

Energy mentors

Eligible community energy groups accepted onto the programme can access up to 6 days of support from the Peer Mentors.  It is perceived that mentoring activities will be undertaken using a range of interventions to include face to face meetings (one to one or group), telephone discussions and email exchanges.

Full details will be provided when you apply for support, and you will be matched with the mentor who meets your needs in terms of project type and location – though there’s no harm in requesting us is there?!

Date posted: November 11, 2014 | Author: | 6 Comments »

Categories: Community Energy

A couple of weeks ago we hosted photo/video journalist John Robertson for a day to talk about life at Hockerton, and how we manage to live sustainably whilst enjoying all the comforts of the 21st century. He was particularly keen to hear about one family’s move from London and how they’d settled in.

It’s always a pleasure to show people round, and see the moment they ‘get’ we’re not a load of judgemental hemp-soled-sandle-wearing soap-dodgers, but that this is a lifestyle that makes sense on so many levels. JR definitely got it, as you’ll see in the film below – and no bribes were offered or taken!

Thanks to him and the folks at Barcroft Media for doing such a good job, with the help of our own overhead shots, and helping us get our message out to readers of the Mail, Telegraph,  Green Building Press and multiple other channels.

Videographer / Director: John Robertson / Buzzpix Aerial Photography and Video, Producer: Amanda Stringfellow, Editor: Kyle Waters.

Date posted: September 20, 2014 | Author: | No Comments »

Categories: Eco homes Sustainable living

energy-label-from-a-vacuum-cleaner-377773

Back in June the Government published its most detailed research yet on electricity use in the home: Powering the Nation 2.

It’s returned to our minds with recent coverage of EU rules on vacuum cleaners.

We understand some people are concerned, but power consumption and performance are 2 very different (eco) kettles of fish, a case well made by this rebuttal from the EU.

It will change the market, but many of Which’s Best Buys already meet new rules, “proving that clever engineering and a well-designed floorhead are equally, if not more important, than a powerful motor”.

A third dimension is creeping into the energy conscious consumer’s priorities alongside power use and performance: time. New time of use tariffs will emerge over the coming decade to try and manage down use during peak demand hours (4pm – 8pm) to avoid the higher financial and environmental costs of flexible supply. Alongside the risk that new tariffs will be no clearer than Economy 7, which leaves about 40% of users out of pocket, there is the risk that consumers will simply pay higher bills as the price for flexibility.

So, here’s the good news from that Powering the Nation report:

“More efficient appliances would make a bigger difference to the peak load than ‘load-switching’ per se”

This is why we need regulations on energy efficiency. Regulations address a lack of information in the market, and in this case they address a (highly understandable) lack of knowledge amongst consumers of the relationship between power use and performance. Of course, it takes time for those efficiencies to be felt in every home, with the potential need for help for fuel poor households, so in the meantime here at Hockerton Housing Project we are timing our flexible use such as our immersion heaters, white goods and the EV to match peak solar generation or off-peak supply hours, and are planning to investigate how to better match use to generation.

And finally, one household has got a cordless vacuum cleaner, one example of how batteries could transform the way and times we use energy. But it’s so useful that, whilst its energy use can be timed to cut financial and environmental costs per kWh, the total energy use could be much higher because it’s so handy. It’s never simple is it?!

 

 

 

Date posted: September 12, 2014 | Author: | No Comments »

Categories: Eco homes Sustainable living