Every 3 – 4 months we read our 50 power and water meters to check how we are doing in terms of consumption, generation and export.

Each household pays for their share of consumption relative to use, with any income from the export of renewable energy shared equally between us.

The resultant figures help us remain aware of our use, not least because we see it relative to (or in competition with?!) our neighbours. It also reminds us how well these houses perform. This can become easy to forget when the house is your home – until heatwaves like this week, when we could feel the difference as the thermal mass soaked up any heat that made it through shaded windows.

* Our average daily energy use was around 23% of a standard house (per house, not incl the garages).
* We exported 38% of what we generated, compared with 48% in the winter
* We earn around 4p for a kWh exported but pay on average 7.5p per kWh we use, so over the last 4 months we’ve missed out on energy worth £145.
* In the last 4 months we’ve generated the equivalent of 95% of our total household use (not including our shares in our community-owned wind turbine of course).
* And we are using 260 litres of water a day per house on average. Potable: non-potable is 1:11. This is a similar ratio to that in the first quarter but an increase overall. Average usage per person is 82 litres, compared with Code for Sustainable Homes Level 5 and 6 target of 80 litres – perhaps due to higher number of washes during peak vegetable gardening season!

A 2 bed eco home, based on the Hockerton Housing Project design, has come up for sale.

eco house for sale - from south

This is a private sale, but if you want to find out more (price available on application), please contact us and we’ll pass on your details to the seller.

eco house for sale  - floorpan

Floorpan

eco house for sale  - grounds

Half acre incl meadow, lake and woodland

eco house for sale  - satellite

View from above

 

 

 

 

 

 

The semi-detached bungalow is on a plot of land adjoining the Project. It was built by some of the original project members so shares the key design details and, importantly, has delivered on its promised performance. The house is south-facing, with a conservatory to the south overlooking a half acre of grounds and a car-port, storage and entrance area to the north.

Eco features

  • Built with high thermal mass, super insulation, buffer zones and high passive solar gain to capture heat in summer and avoid use of heating in winter.
  • Earth sheltering helps insulate the home and minimises the impact on the natural environment.
  • Triple glazed /low E/gas filled units.
  • Mechanical ventilation heat recovery.
  • Electric car charging port.
  • Energy costs of about £500 a year, less than half the national average.
  • Water is supplied through a shared rain water catchment and storage system.
  • There is no mains sewage system in the village. The house shares a septic tank and floating reed bed sewage treatment system.

Rooms

  • Boot room with storage.
  • Utility /shower room including hot water cylinder, sink, washing machine and storage together with basin, wc, shower and towel radiator.
  • Inner hall [3.1m x 3m] currently used as office and library.
  • Kitchen/ dining area 6.2m x 3m, with tall glazed French doors with windows over leading into the conservatory.
  • Sitting room 6.2m x 3m. Window on north wall and tall glazed French doors with windows over leading into conservatory. The rear section of this room [2.2m x 3m] could be adapted to form a third bedroom.
  • Master bedroom suite includes a dressing area [3m x 1.45m], shower room [1.6 x 3m] and bedroom [3.2m x 3m] with tall glazed French doors with windows over leading into conservatory.
  • Bedroom 2 [3.2m x 3m] with mezzanine floor over. Tall glazed French doors with windows over [3.25m x 1.8m] leading into the conservatory.
  • The fully double glazed timber conservatory [12.6m x 3m] has 4 velux roof lights and a wood burning stove.
  • Double french doors lead into the south facing garden approx 24m x 45m with a shared large pond. There is a hedge to the west boundary and woodland leading down to the stream to the south boundary.

Other

  • Total internal floor area approx 127m2.
  • There is a phone and super fast Broadband connection. No TV points.
  • The property is leasehold with a 999 year lease subject to a token peppercorn ground rent.
  • Maintenance of the septic tank sewage system and rain water catchment system is shared with the adjoining dwelling.
Date posted: March 4, 2016 | Author: | 8 Comments »

Categories: Eco homes New Build Sustainable living

Retrofit for the FutureThis week we popped in to one of the homes that we retrofitted in 2010/11 as part of a Government-funded project, Retrofit for the Future, to find out how it was performing.

The headline finding is that the house is now using 9% of the energy it previously used for space and water heating; down from 12493kWh to 1133kWh. Overall energy use has been reduced by 75%, with the carbon emissions from the remaining use offset by a cost-effective investment in off-site renewables.

We visited after one year and found that actual energy use was 47% less than that predicted by SAP. There has been a further significant fall since then. Over the intervening years, the average energy use has been 30% of the use originally predicted for space and water heating, ventilation and lighting; and total average use has been 50% of use in that first year.

We expect heat usage to remain steady at this lower level (for the current occupancy patterns) as the fall can be attributed to one-off factors in that first year:

  • the building was drying out
  • the thermal mass had no heat stored as the build completed in early autumn
  • the winter of 2010/11 was particularly cold

Use of energy for appliances and cooking remains the largest influence on energy use, forming two-thirds of annual use on average. As highlighted in previous posts this is very dependent on working patterns and the number of residents. The final 3% of energy use is by the metering system itself – with metering on 8 rings in the house to enable this analysis.

Last, but certainly not least, was the residents’ feedback. The most notable problem was a rain sensor on the automated Velux windows in the sunspace, but that has been repaired quickly enough, and the occupants continue to enjoy the comfort of their old but cheaper-to-heat home.

Date posted: January 28, 2016 | Author: | 1 Comment »

Categories: Eco homes Existing Homes Performance Monitoring

Pub and car

Spread Eagle pub at Hockerton

Our local pub is up for auction next week, so with unanimous support from a parish meeting, Hockerton has applied to list it as an asset of community value on the basis of:

  • History of community events, from Jubilee fetes to Bin Day Beers
  • Last accessible shared space in the village
  • Site is unsuited to housing
  • Potential for diversification of services
  • Clear appetite for good food and drink in the area

The Spread Eagle has also played an important role in oiling the wheels of our village’s energy co-operative, Sustainable Hockerton, and in helping it celebrate its successes.

Any enterprising chefs or publicans looking to own a zero carbon pub – look no further!

Date posted: October 16, 2015 | Author: | No Comments »

Categories: Sustainable living

This autumn, HHP is racing against the clock to install further solar PV roofs funded by local community energy co-op Sustainable Hockerton.

The plan is to install two roofs on local businesses – one of 10kW and a further one of 27kW. The businesses benefit from lower cost power, Sustainable Hockerton members benefit from continued returns from their investment, and the community benefits from a village sustainability fund.

These new installations will be funded by the co-op’s income from its 225kW wind turbine, potentially with some top-up loans from its members, and will help further diversify the renewable energy systems in our parish.

imageThe clock is, as many of you will know, ticking. The Government plans to substantially cut the feed-in tariff and, as of 1 October, removed the ability to pre-register schemes for the feed-in tariff, removing the certainty that community schemes need to raise investment. These cuts appear far too big and far too early, whilst the attack on investor certainty pushes up costs – which is no way to help reduce energy bills in the long-term. We have sadly also begun to see the impact of specific cuts and a wider policy vacuum on jobs, with the loss of an estimated 1000 jobs at Mark Group and Climate Energy.

We can only hope this attack on renewables is a last gasp from a system historically reliant on the fossil fuel industry. Interest in our approach continues to engage and inspire other communities (pictured above are York Community Energy on a recent visit); and at a crucial time in the run up to Paris talks, the climate now has the Pope, Barack Obama, the governor of the Bank of England and Nanny McPhee firmly on its side.

It is, to say the least, disappointing that the UK Government is no longer leading the green agenda, but this is a global challenge and, as the business world opens its eyes to the high risks it faces, it feels like the balance is shifting.

If you want to find out more about what we’ve achieved at the street and community level, our next Sustainable Living tour is on Saturday 7 November.

Eventbrite - Sustainable Living

Date posted: October 9, 2015 | Author: | No Comments »

Categories: Community Energy Renewable energy